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Last update: Feb 2009

Video



Field testing of the new MICS4 questionnaires
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Pilot survey

The MICS4 pilot survey, carried out in Mombasa, Kenya, was completed on February 18, 2009. The main objective of the pilot survey was to field test the new MICS4 questionnaires and survey procedures. The pilot survey was carried out in collaboration with the UNICEF Kenya Country Office, the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) and the UNICEF Regional Office for Eastern and Southern Africa (see note below).

 

Fieldwork staff was trained over an eleven day period, practicing how to administer the questionnaire and learning to carry out anthropometric measurements, among other things. Data for the pilot survey were collected over a ten day period.

 

In order to gain understanding of the performance of the new questionnaires, interviews were observed and feedback sessions were held with interviewers. Analysis of the data collected will provide further evidence.

 

Based on the lessons from the pilot survey, the MICS4 questionnaires will be finalized and the MICS4 manual and other guidance tools will be developed.

 

The field testing of the new questionnaires was a unique opportunity to gather the UNICEF Regional MICS Coordinators and the UNICEF Headquarters MICS Team with the aim to develop a common understanding on the various methodological aspects related to survey implementation. 

 

Other participants included staff members from:  the UNICEF Headquarters Statistics and Monitoring Section and Early Childhood Development Section, the UNICEF Regional Offices in Nairobi and Amman and the Kenya and Somalia UNICEF Country Offices, as well as external consultants and staff members of the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics.

 

Note: The site of the pilot survey was chosen following KNBS' earlier decision to organize a survey in Mombasa informal settlement areas using MICS tools and instruments. Following the completion of the pilot survey, KNBS initiated the fieldwork for the informal settlements survey. Combining the two initiatives allowed UNICEF to take advantage of the already established logistical and technical process to implement a MICS in Kenya, while giving the MICS Mombasa Informal Settlements Survey fieldwork staff the opportunity to be trained and gain further experience.